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Luther on the Distinction between Law and Gospel

For the first time in English, a truly scholarly translation of Luther’s most famous disputation, referred to as The Antinomian Disputations, is available as part of the newest volume in the ongoing Luther’s WorksVolume 73. Read an excerpt from the introduction below about the doctrines of Law and Gospel.


Luther’s Catechism Series: The Fourth Petition of the Lord’s Prayer

Every Sunday, as a community of believers, congregations say the Lord’s Prayer out loud. Luther goes into detail about what each petition of this prayer means, giving believers an in-depth understanding of exactly what it is they’re praying for.

The Fourth Petition, “Give us this day our daily bread,” thanks God for everything that He gives His creation, including food, drink, house, money, and so on. Read an excerpt from Albrecht Peters’s Commentary on Luther’s Catechisms: Lord’s Prayer to see how God gives humanity goodness through Christ daily.

Luther’s Teaching on Law and Sin

Martin Luther was a phenomenal theologian. He wrote many theses during his lifetime, and he also presided over and responded to many of the academic disputations of others in order to discuss their points and validity. A new edition of Luther’s Works, Volume 73 on disputations, dives more deeply into Luther’s arguments from December 1537 to July 1545. Read an excerpt below from the newest volume concerning arguments on Law and sin.


Luther’s Catechism Series: The Second Petition of the Lord’s Prayer

Luther distinguishes himself from all interpretations of the Second Petition before him, in that in the catechism he bases the kingdom of God in the Gospel of Christ, which in the First Petition he had foreshadowed under the topic of pure doctrine. The ‘Kingdom of Grace’ of the heavenly Father is here on earth only there to be found where the Gospel of our salvation through Christ’s sacrificial death is “genuinely preached throughout the world.” This is and remains Luther’s fundamental insight: How the Church is ‘creatur verbi,’ thus also God’s Kingship is governance through the Word from the cross.

Celebrating the Augsburg Confession

Defending a thesis is a crucial step to obtain a higher degree in modern educational systems. Defending a simple argument has become the function of microscopic critics with the rise of social media and the scrutinization of false information. Imagine having to defend your faith in Christ against an entire kingdom, presenting years’ worth of deep theological insights to the Holy Roman Emperor. This is exactly what happened to Martin Luther on June 25, 1530, a critical day in the Reformation.

Luther’s Catechism Series: Second Article of the Apostles’ Creed

The words “passus sub Pontio Pilato, crucifixus, mortuus et sepultus” are translated by the reformer: “suffered under Pontius Pilate, crucified, dead, and buried”; admittedly, the introductory text to the Large Catechism reads: “(who) had suffered under Pontius Pilate, is crucified, dead, and buried.”

Luther’s Catechism Series: First Article of the Apostle’s Creed

Luther’s interpretation of the First Article is shaped through and through by his astonishment about the character of life as a gift. In this way, the reformer confronts that aspect which Martin Heidegger terms the “foundational question for metaphysics”: “Why is there that which exists rather than the more probable nothingness?” But Luther does not consider this as an abstract philosophical question; instead, from the vantage point of the wonderment of a child: “Why is there something and not nothing?” He considers this from the point of view of one who ventures to trust, on the basis of the biblical witness that tells of a God who dispenses life.

Christ’s Ultimate Victory

To wrap up his writings about loneliness, worry and finding comfort in God, Luther leaves readers with a final message: the ultimate victory has already been won through Christ’s death and resurrection. Read the complete passage from Volume 24 of Luther’s Works and say a prayer of thanks to God for such a victory. 

Finding Peace in Jesus’ Words

Martin Luther preached that peace can be found only in the words of our Lord Jesus Christ. God bestows on Christians the powerful gift of Scripture, and the Holy Spirit gives us the ability to understand it and to communicate with God. In his sermon (recorded in Luther's Works Volume 24), Luther echoes Jesus' statement that although there is strife and turmoil in the world, Jesus has already overcome it.


Never Alone: God Is Always with You

Trying times often cause fear, worry, stress, and anxiety. Currently, it’s also the cause of isolation and social distancing, which can increase loneliness. But Luther reminds us that we are never truly alone because God is always with us—in the joyful days, the sad ones, and even the in-between ones. Read the following passage from Volume 24 of Luther’s Works as a reminder of God’s constant faithfulness and the promises of His Word.