<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1758373551078632&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

Psalm 23: Christ Is Our Shepherd

“The LORD is my Shepherd; I shall not want.” Psalm 23 is one of the best-known Psalms, often a poem we turn to for refuge during times of distress or uncertainty. But why has this passage become so popular? Read from the latest Concordia Commentary, Psalms 1–50, by Timothy Saleska, answering this question below.  

Digging Deeper into Scripture: Acts 2

As Pentecost approaches, take a few minutes to read Acts 2:1–21, the story of the Holy Spirit descending on the disciples. This passage is the fulfillment of an Old Testament promise and is in response to Jesus’ saving work on the cross.

Our Current Suffering and Eternal Salvation

Dealing with daily suffering is a sad reality of living in a fallen world. But in Romans 8:18, Paul reminds all believers that our current suffering is worth the beauty of heaven and seeing our Savior’s face after our time on this earth is done. Read commentary by Michael Middendorf on this verse from Romans 1–8, Volume 1 of the Concordia Commentary series below.

Luther’s Catechism Series: Second Article of the Apostles’ Creed

The words “passus sub Pontio Pilato, crucifixus, mortuus et sepultus” are translated by the reformer: “suffered under Pontius Pilate, crucified, dead, and buried”; admittedly, the introductory text to the Large Catechism reads: “(who) had suffered under Pontius Pilate, is crucified, dead, and buried.”

Psalm 27 Commentary: True Salvation in God

One of the themes that weaves its way through Psalm 27 is the belief that true salvation is to be found only in the presence of Yhwh. The speaker desires to dwell in the house of Yhwh so that he can see “the beauty of Yhwh” (27:4). And he knows that in His house, Yhwh will protect him from his enemies (27:4–6). When he feels threatened, he is determined to seek Yhwh’s presence, and he asks Yhwh not to hide His presence from him or to forsake him (27:8–9). And the final encouragement from the speaker is to “wait for Yhwh” (27:14).

Luther’s Catechism Series: First Article of the Apostle’s Creed

Luther’s interpretation of the First Article is shaped through and through by his astonishment about the character of life as a gift. In this way, the reformer confronts that aspect which Martin Heidegger terms the “foundational question for metaphysics”: “Why is there that which exists rather than the more probable nothingness?” But Luther does not consider this as an abstract philosophical question; instead, from the vantage point of the wonderment of a child: “Why is there something and not nothing?” He considers this from the point of view of one who ventures to trust, on the basis of the biblical witness that tells of a God who dispenses life.

A Socially-Distant 2020 Call Day

Call Day is one of the high holidays in the life of many LCMS pastors and their families. The months leading up to Call Day are some of the most stressful and exciting and infuriating one can imagine. The game of trying to guess where one might be called is entirely futile, and yet, it can’t be avoided. Soon-to-be pastors and their families are just so excited for the next chapter of their lives to be revealed that it is all they can talk about for months. The time leading up to Call Day is a time of preparation and hope amid chaos. It’s almost as though the season before Call Day is Advent, and Call Day itself is Christmas.

Easter: A Festival of Joy

Easter Sunday has come and His Church rejoices in the beauty and wonder of the resurrection. Christ has defeated sin, death, and the devil himself, and the heavens and earth celebrate for weeks to come. The season of Easter is truly a time of rejoicing in Christ’s victory. Read C. F. W. Walther’s sermon on the true joy of Easter below from Gospel Sermons I .

A Funeral for a King

As Good Friday approaches, the Church prepares for the most somber occasion of the year: Jesus’ death. But in mourning, Christians know that His death also brings His resurrection. His suffering takes the burden of sin off the sinner’s shoulders. Read C. F. W. Walther’s Good Friday sermons from Gospel Sermons, Volume 1  below to see why we can rejoice in our mourning.


Christ’s Ultimate Victory

To wrap up his writings about loneliness, worry and finding comfort in God, Luther leaves readers with a final message: the ultimate victory has already been won through Christ’s death and resurrection. Read the complete passage from Volume 24 of Luther’s Works and say a prayer of thanks to God for such a victory.