<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1758373551078632&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

Recent Posts by Concordia Publishing House

Easter: A Festival of Joy

Easter Sunday has come and His Church rejoices in the beauty and wonder of the resurrection. Christ has defeated sin, death, and the devil himself, and the heavens and earth celebrate for weeks to come. The season of Easter is truly a time of rejoicing in Christ’s victory. Read C. F. W. Walther’s sermon on the true joy of Easter below from Gospel Sermons I .

A Funeral for a King

As Good Friday approaches, the Church prepares for the most somber occasion of the year: Jesus’ death. But in mourning, Christians know that His death also brings His resurrection. His suffering takes the burden of sin off the sinner’s shoulders. Read C. F. W. Walther’s Good Friday sermons from Gospel Sermons, Volume 1  below to see why we can rejoice in our mourning.


Christ’s Ultimate Victory

To wrap up his writings about loneliness, worry and finding comfort in God, Luther leaves readers with a final message: the ultimate victory has already been won through Christ’s death and resurrection. Read the complete passage from Volume 24 of Luther’s Works and say a prayer of thanks to God for such a victory. 

Finding Peace in Jesus’ Words

Martin Luther preached that peace can be found only in the words of our Lord Jesus Christ. God bestows on Christians the powerful gift of Scripture, and the Holy Spirit gives us the ability to understand it and to communicate with God. In his sermon (recorded in Luther's Works Volume 24), Luther echoes Jesus' statement that although there is strife and turmoil in the world, Jesus has already overcome it.


Never Alone: God Is Always with You

Trying times often cause fear, worry, stress, and anxiety. Currently, it’s also the cause of isolation and social distancing, which can increase loneliness. But Luther reminds us that we are never truly alone because God is always with us—in the joyful days, the sad ones, and even the in-between ones. Read the following passage from Volume 24 of Luther’s Works as a reminder of God’s constant faithfulness and the promises of His Word.

God Is With You. Even Now.

A lot of worry and fear are currently happening in our world. This fear can shift your focus away from Christ and His love for you. In uncertain times, it can be difficult to understand that God has a certain plan for the world. The following passage from Martin Luther’s Church Postils I is a great reminder to cast all your worries and fears on Jesus because He will always provide for those who believe.

Luther's Catechism Series: The Ten Commandments Part 2

Leading up to Christ’s crucifixion, the Gospel of Matthew recounts that “the chief priests and the whole council were seeking false testimony against Jesus that they might put Him to death” (26:59). Bearing false testimony is breaking the Eighth Commandment, but through Christ’s resurrection, we are forgiven. But what encompasses the entirety of the Eighth Commandment? Read Albrecht Peters’  commentary on Luther’s interpretations of this commandment to see what this commandment fully encompasses.

Wording and Interpretation of the Commandment

The translations of the Eighth Commandment vary slightly: “You shall not speak false testimony against your neighbor.” Following tradition, Luther wavers between Zeugnis and Gezeugnis for testimonium. Loqueris he typically translates verbatim as “speak” —here and there also with “give.” . . . Luther consistently adds “against your neighbor” and thereby underlines the specific direction of the commandment toward the neighbor, which characterizes his interpretation.

Jesus’ Temptations: Reflecting on Your Struggle against Sin

During the Lenten season, Lutherans inwardly reflect on Christ’s sacrifice for us and our own sinful nature to prepare for the coming resurrection and Christ’s victory over Satan. In the Book of Matthew, Jesus is tempted in the desert by Satan multiple times. Christians are tempted by Satan daily. Although we sometimes stand strong against him, we live in a broken world and topple into his pitfalls frequently, asking for God’s forgiveness. As you inwardly reflect on your sins, read this Concordia Commentary passage from Matthew 1:1–11:1 , written by Jeffrey A. Gibbs, to see what God’s Word says about Jesus’ saving work against Satan.

The Word Became Flesh: How Is Christ both God and Man?

Ash Wednesday marks the start of Lent. For forty days and forty nights, Lutherans reflect inwardly on themselves and on Christ. As Christians, it seems as if the person of Christ is relatively well known: He is the Savior. Yet Martin Chemnitz writes extensively on Christ in The Two Natures in Christ, reminding believers that Christ is both God and man. As Lent begins, take time to reflect on the person of Christ by reading a passage from Chemnitz’s work below.

Defending the Faith: Martin Luther Holds True to His Theses

Defending Lutheran beliefs can be difficult, especially against those who fervently believe differently than you. Martin Luther had to defend his theses against hostile adversaries, including Pope Leo X. Talk about a difficult battle! Lutherans commemorate him today to show thanks for his faithfulness to doctrine and to give God thanks for granting Dr. Luther the strength to profess the true faith to all who would listen. In honor of his commemoration, read a passage from a sermon given by one of his students, Johann Mathesius, from Luther’s Works, Companion Volume, Sixteenth-Century Biographies of Martin Luther.