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Fifth Sunday in Lent

Today’s devotional reading comes from the letter to parents in Ezekiel and the Dry Bones: Arch Books.

Scripture Readings

Ezekiel 37:1–14
Psalm 130
Romans 8:1–11
John 11:1–53

Read the propers for today on lutherancalendar.org.

Introduction

As Ezekiel prophesied the Lord’s words, he witnessed God breathing life into the valley of dry bones. On that day, God promised to bring life to the house of Israel through His Spirit. In Christ, we see that promise fulfilled, as God’s people are given life in Christ, saved from the darkness of the valley of sin and death.

Devotional Reading

We’re so accustomed to the dramatic scenes and special effects of today’s movies and television shows that it might be easy for us to imagine what this vision was like for Ezekiel. He was in a valley of skeletons. The bones were as dry as could be; there could be no mistaking that there was no life in them. In this vision, God caused bones to assemble, flesh to form, breath to be restored, and people to live again.

The Lord God intended this vision to remind us that He is our Creator and that only He has authority over all life and death. God can—and would—give life, restore His people, and lead them to the Promised Land. He sent this vision to Ezekiel, a priest, so the children of Israel would be reminded and reassured of this.

This Old Testament story reminds us of Easter and Jesus’ resurrection from the dead—by God’s power. It reminds us that at the command of the Son of God, Lazarus walked out of his grave. And it assures us that we, too, will one day be restored to God in heaven. . . .

Like those dry bones, God’s people are scattered all over the world. Apart from Him, we cannot live. But God gives us life. He will gather His people together. He does this through the work of Jesus in our lives. By sending His own Son to die for our sins, God restores us to Himself. He sends His Spirit to give us the breath of life and hope of eternity so we will know that He is Lord.

Devotional reading is from Ezekiel and the Dry Bones: Arch Books, page 16 © 2012 Concordia Publishing House. All rights reserved.

Hymn

© 2016 Concordia Publishing House. All rights reserved.

 

Written by

Anna Johnson

Deaconess Anna Johnson is a marketing manager at Concordia Publishing House. After graduating from the deaconess program at Concordia University Chicago, she continued her studies at the University of Colorado—Denver in education and human development. She has worked as a church youth director and served a variety of other nonprofit organizations, such as the Lutheran Mission Society of Maryland. Anna loves playing video games and drinking a hot cup of tea almost as much as she loves her cat and her husband.

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