Nathan Grime is from Fort Wayne, Indiana. He is a 2020 graduate of Hillsdale College, where he studied rhetoric, public address, and journalism. Nathan is the fifth- and sixth-grade teacher and assistant kantor at Our Savior Lutheran School in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Recent Posts by Nathan Grime

Music of the Month: Artful Hymn Accompaniments for Piano

Timothy Shaw’s collection of hymn accompaniments for piano showcases the range and technique of the piano as an instrument to lead congregational singing. This collection is the second in a new series: Artful Hymn Accompaniments for Piano, inaugurated last year with its first set by composer Jacob Weber.

Music of the Month: Inviting Them to Sing

Hymn introductions provide an opportunity to invite the congregation to lift up its voice. They needn’t be long or complicated in order to be engaging. This resource provides 60 introductions and an extended preface that provides tools and suggestions for the average church musician to craft his or her own introductions. These introductions are extremely useful, covering 117 hymns in Lutheran Service Book.

Music of the Month: Pentecost Mosaics

This is the 11th edition in the popular Mosaics series by Jacob B. Weber. Pentecost Mosaicscontains versatile and festive settings useful for Pentecost and beyond. Highlights include a suite on “Come, Holy Ghost, Creator Blest” (Festival Introduction, Harmonization, and Organ Stanza) and six variations on “Holy Spirit, Light Divine.” Other hymns include “O Day Full of Grace”; “Come Down, O Love Divine”; “Holy Spirit, End Our Sadness”; and “Come, Holy Ghost, God and Lord.”

Music of the Month: Lutheran Music and Meaning

Music has meaning. More than a series of notes, more than associated verbal texts, more than personal entertainment—music has meaning. In Lutheran Music and Meaning, author Daniel Zager demonstrates how music signals and conveys meaning. With suggested listening examples, chapters discuss the means that the great Lutheran composers used to convey meaning and in what ways liturgy, Church Year, and lectionary provide integrated contexts for meaning. Written specifically for the singer and listener, this book assists the curious in learning more about Lutheran music, its function, and its meaning.

Music of the Month: At the Lamb’s High Feast We Sing

Triumphant and upbeat, Sandra Eithun’s setting of “At the Lamb’s High Feast We Sing” has limited bell changes and few rhythmic challenges, making it easy to prepare for developing ensembles. The LV passages, martellato, and varied dynamics add interest for the listener and help to encourage musicality in the ringers. 

Music of the Month: Hymns Complete

John Behnke has begun a series for organists titled Hymns Complete, designed to accompany hymns as they are sung by congregations. Each volume contains introductions and accompaniments for specific stanzas of well-known hymns, according to their texts in Lutheran Service Book.

Music of the Month: When I Behold Jesus Christ

This month's selected piece is a well-crafted modern hymn concertato scored for two-part voices, two treble instruments, piano, optional congregation, and optional violoncello by Matthew Machemer. “When I Behold Jesus Christ” features repetitive and overlapping piano patterns that are complemented with polyphonic instrumental lines and accessible choral writing. The overall feel of the piece has a minimalist flair.

Music of the Month: Advent with Minimum Pedal

Edwin T. Childs adds to his series of settings for minimum pedal, providing a collection of hymn tunes for the season of Advent in Advent with Minimum Pedal. These inventive preludes are suitable as hymn introductions, preludes, voluntaries, and postludes, and will appeal to organists with limited pedal abilities or seasoned organists that need something in a pinch.

Music of the Month: “God Is Our Refuge and Strength”

Composed for Concordia University Chicago’s celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, this setting for two-part voices and piano is characterized by soaring vocal lines and idiomatic piano writing. With text that is fresh and expressive, this anthem is appropriate not only for Reformation but also throughout the Church Year.

Music of the Month: “Lord, Keep Us Steadfast in Your Word”

“Lord, Keep Us Steadfast in Your Word” (LSB 655) is one of Martin Luther’s most well-known hymns. It was also one of the last hymns Luther wrote. The text originates from Luther’s Admonition to Pray against the Turks which was written in 1541. Translations of the hymn into English rebrand it as a general plea to the triune God to defend His Church from all her enemies, both physical and spiritual. At its genesis, however, the hymn was described in a 1544 Wittenberg hymnal as “a children’s hymn to sing against the two archenemies of Christ and His holy Church: the pope and the Turks.”

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