<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1758373551078632&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

Hope in the Resurrection

This post is an excerpt from Getting Through Grief: Eight Biblical Gifts for Living with Loss.

How can you be absolutely certain that, even in your grief and loss, you can live with hope? How can you know for sure that you won’t be disappointed? The answer is found in Jesus’ resurrection from the once-thought-permanent condition of death.

Easter: A Festival of Joy

Easter Sunday has come and His Church rejoices in the beauty and wonder of the resurrection. Christ has defeated sin, death, and the devil himself, and the heavens and earth celebrate for weeks to come. The season of Easter is truly a time of rejoicing in Christ’s victory. Read C. F. W. Walther’s sermon on the true joy of Easter below from Gospel Sermons I .

Luther on Christ’s “Sermon” to the Emmaus Disciples

 In this excerpt from Luther’s sermon on Luke 24:13–35 included in his Church Postil, the reformer reflects on the “sermon” that the risen Christ preached to the two disciples as they traveled from Jerusalem to Emmaus. With Christians throughout history, Luther here ponders what Christ may have told the disciples, as He “interpreted to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning Himself.”

Martin Luther on the Diaconate

The following excerpt is taken from the Epistle Sermon for St. Stephen’s Day, on Acts 6:8–16; 7:54–60 (paragraphs 31–32).

An Eastertide Reflection from Martin Luther

Martin Luther’s preaching during Eastertide in 1544 and 1545 provided his listeners with four sermons on 1 Corinthians 15, the great resurrection chapter of St. Paul. “It would be better,” Luther wrote, “to give this season its due and, between Easter and Pentecost, for the instruction and comfort of the people, to give a thorough exposition of the article concerning both Christ’s resurrection and our own—that is, the resurrection of all the dead—on the basis of the preaching of the apostles, such as the fifteenth chapter of St. Paul’s first Epistle to the Corinthians, all of which deals with the resurrection of the dead” [WA 21:349–50]. The sermons emphasized the assurance of the general resurrection; the ways in which Christians can “read” nature and be assured of God’s miraculous power to bring life out of death; and the unity of Christ’s resurrection with the resurrection of Christians, which means Christ’s victory over death also belongs to Christians.

For your Eastertide reflection, the following is a condensed version of the third sermon, on 1 Cor. 15:51–53. Here Luther contrasts the “bearable” divine speech in the present preaching of the Word with the unbearable sounds of the Last Day: the shout of the angel and the trumpet of God. The Christian should always keep the Last Day in mind, Luther says, as they fulfill their vocations in the world faithfully, remembering the last trumpet while enjoying the “eating, drinking, good cheer, and happiness” that God grants as a benevolent Father—but not mocking God and the last judgment with security amid unrepentant sin.