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Written by

John D. Eckrich

John D. Eckrich, MD, is a board-certified internist and gastroenterologist in St. Louis, as well as founder of Grace Place Wellness Ministries, a recognized service organization of the LCMS that is focused on the bodily, mental, and spiritual wellness of professional church workers. He is an author and nationally recognized speaker on health and wellness. His book Family Wellness: Raising Resilient Christ-Purposed Children will be published by CPH late this summer as a wellness resource and textbook for families.

Recent Posts by John D. Eckrich

Anxiety and the Pandemic: How Parents Can Cope While Sending Children Back to School

You, as parents, serve as the critical link in the bicycle chain of getting our educational system back on the road during this crisis, both for our nation and for our families. When you brought your child into this world, you accepted the vocation of parenting: to be loving, conscientious caretakers and leaders in your child’s life, both during your child’s earthly travel and, through Christ, into eternity. Without the Spirit’s presence and your understanding, commitment, sacrifice, and hope for your children, this quest to restart our lives and economy safely won’t be successful. Although there is enough anxiety for all within this chain, that of parents is perhaps the hardest to recognize or, at least to accept. I can guarantee your anxiety is observed easily by your children and is highly palpable in the planning of your school’s teachers and administrators.

Maintaining Your Marbles During COVID-19

If you are anything like me, you are starting your days looking for your “marbles”—those elements of clear thinking, emotional steadiness, calm relational clarity, and clear purpose that normally anchor your mental well-being. Yet now we are socially separated with multiple barriers to our normal modes of communication and relationship maintenance.

Weeks ago, we could walk down the hall, respond to questions face-to-face with colleagues, and, importantly, use our social and emotional IQs to read one another’s responses to our communication. We could add a moment of “blowing off steam” or even “taking a breather” along with the actual business of sharing ideas and strategies. We were able to shake a hand, hug our children or grandchildren, share a meal, and worship together under the same shelter. Not now. We’re experiencing isolation.