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Ten Ways to Encourage Intergenerational Faith Development

When intergenerational learning happens, bonds are formed. Wisdom is shared. Faith challenges are tackled. Most important, these relationships bind people to the church and to one another so the faith can be organically passed down the generations. Here are some principles for intergenerational education.

Faith Development in Adulthood


Having finished confirmation, Sunday School, and youth group, some adults feel like their faith lives have plateaued. The demands of maintaining a home, a job, school, and relationships with friends and family can leave adults feeling drained. On the other hand, adults who struggle to find meaning in their daily work can feel restless. Without regular classes or caregivers to guide their faith, adults need support from the church community to keep faith their number-one priority.

Faith Development in High School

Teenagers will discard some aspects from their previous experiences of faith, moving on to new ideas and beliefs that make sense to their ways of thinking. Discussion of theology and what God says about the issues teenagers face are important to them.

Faith Development in Middle School

Middle school students need to be loved and valued. They need to know that they are important to adults, even though they often communicate that adults are not particularly important to them.

Faith Development in Upper Elementary Students

Upper elementary students like to talk about their faith and discuss issues that bother them. They are adept at listening to the opinions of others, and peers can often answer their questions as clearly as the teacher is able. They want to know how to apply their faith to everyday situations.

Faith Development in Early Elementary Students

Younger children in this age group trust God in the same way they trust adults in their lives. They talk about God as their Father and Jesus as God’s Son, but they still confuse God and Jesus. Older children begin to understand the difference between God the Father and Jesus; some add the concept of the Holy Spirit to their base of knowledge.

Faith Development in Early Childhood


Early childhood students express their love for Jesus in songs, art, prayers, and worship. They make up their own prayers and are able to ask for forgiveness. They want to love and obey God. Teachers and other adults need to furnish them with frequent reminders of God’s love.

Faith Development in Toddlers

Toddlers need to feel unconditional love and acceptance. They need to interact with adults in positive ways. As we teach them, we need to show interest and concern for each child. This is how young children begin to understand God’s love for them.