<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1758373551078632&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

Product of the Month: Four Advent Hymns for Twelve Bells

Our featured product for October is Sandra Eithun’s new handbell collection, Four Advent Hymns for Twelve Bells. Learn more about Sandra’s composition process and listen to a preview of each of the hymns!

A Unique Composition

When Sandra Eithun begins composing, she always puts the needs of the church first. “When I write for bells, there are parameters: How many octaves? What will be the difficulty level? Is this a commission? Will there be chimes or other instruments? How busy do the musicians need to be without destroying the musicality of the piece or the integrity of the musical line?”

This composition process is displayed beautifully in her new piece Four Advent Hymns for Twelve Bells. Her precise note selection and careful attention to detail are clear throughout. Each of the four hymns allows a group of six ringers to cover a three-octave range. The hymns also span difficulty levels, ranging from II–III, which makes them accessible for groups of various experience levels.

New Settings of Advent Favorites

Four Advent Hymns for Twelve Bells features the following four hymns, making it a great collection for the Sundays in Advent or even on Christmas Eve:

  • “Come, Thou Long-Expected Jesus”
  • “Comfort, Comfort Ye My People”
  • “Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence”
  • “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel”

Listen to a preview of the hymns below!

Applications Beyond Advent

In addition to during Advent, many of these settings can be used again throughout the Church Year. For example, “Let All Mortal Flesh Keep Silence” makes for a great Communion hymn any time of the year. JEFFERSON, the tune for “Come, Thou Long-Expected Jesus,” is also used in the Easter hymn “Who Are You Who Walk in Sorrow” (LSB 476).

The versatility of these pieces offers the collection great mileage. You can pull it out many times during the Church Year and know that your ringers will always enjoy playing this unique, accessible music.


Explore More Pieces by Sandra Eithun

View Compositions

Written by

Peter Reske

Peter C. Reske, senior editor of music/worship at Concordia Publishing House, holds degrees in English literature and historical musicology from Marquette University and The Pennsylvania State University. He was the editor of Lutheran Service Book and its attendant resources.

Featured

1Thessalonians

Books of the Bible—Study Questions: 1 Thessalonians

The Book of 1 Thessalonians calls believers to live in the Gospel and fulfill their calling in the joy of the Holy Spirit. Paul reminds the...

high-school

Adjusting to School as a Lutheran College Student

College is tough. With tough classes, trying to make new friends and getting involved, it can be a lot. Then trying to find a new church...

Hymnals_open-1

Hymns as Poems: What Do They Mean without Music?

Although I think that the music is essential to the hymn in the end, taking the text out of the music can give us a clearer understanding...

Latest

Hymnals_open-1

Hymns as Poems: What Do They Mean without Music?

Although I think that the music is essential to the hymn in the end, taking the text out of the music can give us a clearer understanding...

blog-onethingsneedful-1

Hymn of the Month: One Thing’s Needful

The hymn's title is appropriate; in its five stanzas, we hear of how Christ is the one thing needful for the Christian.

POTM-984338

Music of the Month: Go, My Children, with My Blessing

Kevin Hildebrand’s setting of the favorite hymn is flexible for SATB or two-part choir or soloists, organ, optional congregation, flute,...