<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1758373551078632&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
Written by

DawnW

Dawn Mirly Weinstock has been with Concordia Publishing House for 25 years and has served as a production editor for professional and academic books for more than 10 years. Her projects have included Luther's Works, Johann Gerhard’s Theological Commonplaces, and the writings of Hermann Sasse, C. F. W. Walther, and many others.

Recent Posts by DawnW

What Does Luther Say about Trust in Christ?

155188As we pause this Ash Wednesday to reflect on our sinfulness and our need for a Savior, let us also meditate with Luther on the importance of trusting that Christ is truly our Savior from sin, death, and the devil. The following excerpt from Luther’s Church Postil comes from a sermon on Mark 16:1–8. What a gracious God we have to send His only Son into the flesh so that through His death and resurrection we may be reconciled with God and may now call Christ our Brother and God our Father in complete confidence!

Luther on Christ’s Genealogy

LW67The following excerpt from Luther’s Annotations on Matthew 1–18 (found in volume 67 of the American Edition of Luther’s Works) provides the reformer’s commentary on Matthew’s genealogy of Christ found in the Gospel’s first chapter.

Luther on the Development of the Creed

155189Luther repeatedly pointed Christians old and new to the articles of the Apostles’ Creed as the simplest, most profound statement of faith. Not only did he address the Creed in his catechisms, but it found its way into his sermons with great frequency. The following excerpt from Luther’s 1535 Trinity Sunday sermon provides the reformer’s commentary on the development of the Creed and his use of the Creed to distinguish the persons of the Trinity and their unique works. For the complete sermon, see Volume 78 of the American Edition of Luther’s Works, due to release this month.


Announcing the Release of Vol. 78 of Luther’s Works

155189The fourth volume in Concordia’s release of Luther’s Church Postil (sermons for the church year) offers Luther’s sermons for the Epistle and Gospel readings from Trinity Sunday through the Tenth Sunday after Trinity. Part of the ongoing translation of Luther’s Works, this volume also includes Luther’s Several Beautiful Sermons on 1 John, On Love (preached in 1532 and first published in 1533).

Luther on Peter’s Confession of Christ

LW67Volume 67 of the American Edition of Luther’s Works (released this past summer) completes the translation of Luther’s “commentary” on the Gospel of Matthew as delivered in sermons (vol. 68) and in his Annotations on Matthew 1–18 (vol. 67). Taken together, these writings are the reformer’s most substantial continuous engagement with St. Matthew’s Gospel or indeed with any of the Synoptics.

The following excerpt is taken from Luther’s Annotations on Matthew 1–18.

Luther on Ghosts

155188As secular society observes Halloween and Christians prepare for All Saints’ Day, this excerpt from Luther’s sermon on Luke 24:36–47 (included in his Church Postil) on ghosts or “wandering spirits” seems appropriate. Luther believed in apparitions—but as a trick of the devil intended to subvert the faith of Christians. Read on for the reformer’s perspective and for his call to fight such apparitions not with sharpened stakes or garlic but with the only trustworthy weapons at the disposal of God’s saints: God’s Word and faith.

Luther’s Works Vol. 67 Reveals Luther’s Preaching Style

LW67Volume 67 of the American Edition of Luther’s Works (released this past summer) completes the translation of Luther’s “commentary” on the Gospel of Matthew as delivered in sermons (vol. 68) and in his Annotations on Matthew 1–18 (vol. 67). Taken together, these writings are the reformer’s most substantial continuous engagement with St. Matthew’s Gospel or indeed with any of the Synoptics.

Announcing the Release of Chemnitz’s Church Order

churchorderFor the first time in English, pastors, scholars, and historians can explore a crucial text in the process of the ongoing reformation of the German churches. The 1569 Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel Church Order (Chemnitz’s Works Vol. 9) was prepared by Martin Chemnitz and Jacob Andreae, two men who would go on to craft the Formula of Concord. This Church Order reveals not only what those who confessed the Augsburg Confession believed, but how the Lutheran Reformation put that faith into action and handed down the faith by means of orderly worship, church governance, and education. In a modern context, this volume’s combination of doctrine and practice may provide new solutions for the church’s challenges regarding Christian education, formation of Christians who stand in their confession against worldly influences, and congregational leadership.

Announcing the Release of On the Law (Johann Gerhard)

530002On the Law, the newest volume in the translation of Johann Gerhard’s Theological Commonplaces, is now available. In this volume, Gerhard addresses the moral Law of God, revealed in Scripture and nature, as well as all other kinds of laws, such as the ceremonies and civil laws of the Old Testament. Here the reader finds a comprehensive Lutheran moral theology rooted in God’s command and Christ’s fulfillment of the Law. Gerhard examines each commandment in detail and resolves various difficulties and cases of conscience, which are still relevant today. Also in this volume is the commonplace On Ceremonial and Forensic Laws, which shows that these categories of laws from the Old Testament have been abrogated while at the same time pointing to their importance for Christians in understanding God’s acts of old with His people and their fulfillment in the work of Jesus Christ.

Luther on Prophecies concerning Christ’s Resurrection

155188As we continue the celebration of the great Easter Feast, today’s excerpt from Luther’s Church Postil comes from a sermon on Acts 13:26–39. Here Luther addresses Paul’s use of passages from the Psalms and from Isaiah to prove the resurrection. In addition, he points out that Christ is both true God and true man (the Son of David), the promised Messiah who would save His people from sin, death, and hell.